Strike the rock!

soon...

soon...

Tonight I led a group in the practice of Lectio Divina. Modified and truncated, to fit the circumstances, but all of the elements were there.

The passage was the first reading for this Sunday:

This Sunday’s Readings

I asked everyone to, after they heard the passage read, allow a word or two, or a phrase come to awareness.  Funny, I didn’t expect it to happen to me!

Strike the rock.

And that staff was the one Moses used to part the Red Sea.  Now it strikes the rock, bringing life-giving water to the grumbling, complaining children of Israel.

Oh, how slowly we learn.

Richard Rohr writes about another “slow learner” in his book, Everything Belongs. Yes, Bill, I have finally gotten around to reading it.  Lent is the perfect time for this!  Anyway, it’s Julian of Norwich, who like many spiritual teachers, did her greatest work later in life.  She discovered, as Richard puts it, living with paradox, and still being at peace. Julian said,

“first there is the fall, and then there is the recovery from the fall.  But both are the mercy of God.”

Richard continues:

How did we ever lose that kind of wisdom?  Especially when it is almost everybody’s experience?  Only the spacious, contemplative mind can see so broadly and trust so deeply.  The small calculating mind wants either/or, win or lose, good or bad.  Yet we all know that the deacon sings of “felix culpa” on Holy Saturday night.  We were saved, the liturgy says, by a “happy mistake.”  Jesus reminded Julian that his crucifixion was the worst thing that happened in human history and God made the best out of it to take away all of our excuses.  As they were for Jesus, “our wounds become honors.”  The great and merciful surprise is that we come to God not by doing it right but by doing it wrong!

It is our grumbling in the wilderness that brings us to God.

Thank you.

Come Out the Wilderness

Are you ready?

Be well, and at peace,

Phil


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